Forsiden

Emnekatalogen

Søk

Sjanger

Analyse/tolkning (709) Anmeldelse (bok, film...) (634) Artikkel (927) Biografi (262) Dikt (1036) Essay (552) Eventyr (115) Faktaoppgave (374) Fortelling (833) Kåseri (610) Leserinnlegg (119) Novelle (1310) Rapport (621) Referat (173) Resonnerende (204) Sammendrag av pensum (179) Særemne (155) Særoppgave (337) Temaoppgave (1246) Annet (527)

Språk

Bokmål (8054) Engelsk (1612) Fransk (26) Nynorsk (1123) Spansk (11) Tysk (38) Annet (59)
Meny

Du er her: Skole > Character analysis of "Macbeth" (Shakespeare)

Character analysis of "Macbeth" (Shakespeare)

Analyse av Shakespeare's "Macbeth".

Sjanger
Analyse/tolkning
Språkform
Engelsk
Lastet opp
02.05.2002
Tema
MacBeth


At the beginning of the play, Macbeth is the "bravest" soldier and the honorable Thane of Glamis. His rank and nobility are of great value, and he seems to be fit for his status. But his encounter with the witches awakens in him a deep impatient ambition. Immediately after the first prophecy of being Thane of Cawdor becomes true the "horrid image" of the murder of King Duncan in order to become king himself crosses his mind. He is not totally cold and solely ambitious as shown by his terror of the murder image, which thoroughly defies his loyalty. There is love in Macbeth as shown by his letter to Lady Macbeth in which he calls her his "dearest partner of greatness." Macbeth is already thinking about being king, but he is undecided about whether it is better to succumb to the temptation presented by the witches or to wait for Fate to crown him. Banquo warns him that at times evil forces "tell us truths . . . to betray's in deepest consequence."

 

<bilde>
Even though he does not state it out loud, Macbeth does care about morality and religion, as demonstrated in his soliloquy (I, IV, 12-28) where he lists the three reasons why he should not kill Duncan: he is "his kinsman," "his subject" and "his host." Macbeth adds that "Duncan hath born his faculties so meek, hath been so clear in his great office, that his virtues will plead like angels." Lady Macbeth knows her husband and feels that he is "too full o' th' milk of human kindness." To counter this she accuses Macbeth of being a coward if he does not kill Duncan. Macbeth does not want to be a coward, either as soldier or as husband, so he accepts to murder Duncan. His ambition and self-image of bravery win over his virtues. Nevertheless he is remorseful after murdering Duncan, and he masks his fear of being found with rage against the supposed murderers and thus kills the drunk guards.


Legg inn din oppgave!

Vi setter veldig stor pris på om dere gir en tekst til denne siden, uansett sjanger eller språk. Alt fra større prosjekter til små tekster. Bare slik kan skolesiden bli bedre!

Last opp stil